Speed dating campbelltown nsw

Rated 3.84/5 based on 839 customer reviews

The 73rd Regiment was stationed here in large barracks built about the year 1820, and still standing in Bridge Street. The main history of this period will be found elsewhere, in such articles as "The Hospital", "Churches", "Magistrates", "Early Schools", "Military", and specially in the separate articles dealing with the following pioneers:—Andrew Thompson, Richard Fitzgerald, Dr. These were well built, for four, if not five, Macquarie buildings are still in use—St. This was originally built of brick for a granary, one hundred and one feet by twenty-five feet, and twenty-three feet high, with three floors, and was completed in August, 1803. Thomas Riccaby died on the 15th May, 1818, aged 67 years. "Nor can we close this tribute to his memory without recurring to the important services Mr. From respect and esteem for the Memory of the deceased, this Monument is erected by LACHLAN MACQUARIE, GOVERNOR of New South Wales [A. The words in brackets appear in a copy of the inscription which was made about 1820, and is now in the Public Records' Office, London. At first the soldiers' and prisoners' barracks were in Thompson Square, near the Windsor wharf. Matthew's Church and rector, and the Court House being the best examples. The present gaol was built on the same site in 1859. Thompson's executors, and made into a hospital and grounds for fifty patients. This farm, part of which was formerly known as Catherine Farm, extended from the eastern boundary of the Presbyterian Church to a point near Fitzgerald Street, and included New Street, Catherine Street, Church Street, and Windsor Terrace. Thompson rendered this colony and many of his fellow creatures during the heavy and public distresses which the floods at the Hawkesbury produced among the settlers in that extensive district. Thompson's exertions on a late occasion were for two days and two nights unremittingly directed to the assistance of the sufferers, and we lament to add that in those offices of humanity he not only exposed himself to personal danger, but laid the foundation for that illness which has deprived the world of a valuable life. Before closing this sketch of Andrew Thompson we must mention that he had some bitter enemies in Sydney, though none locally, who painted him in a very different colour. Andrew's College, was next called and settled, in 1896, and he worked with great energy, having the church thoroughly renovated and repaired at considerable expense in 1897. For the first twenty-five or thirty years of the settlement of New South Wales, the Hawkesbury was looked upon as the granary of the colony. In his house were held several meetings of, local residents, one on 20th January, 1807, to petition the Governor aginst the importation of wheat. Governor Bligh, who took to farming in 1807, bought several holdings on the river, near Pitt Town, near where the present punt is located. A portion of this (six perches) was resumed for public road purposes on 25th January, 1899. When floods came the greatest anxiety was caused in Sydney and Parramatta, and floods were fairly frequent in those days. We might here mention that wheat was selling on 19th January, 1806, at nine shillings and threepence in Windsor, and ten shillings a bushel in Sydney. Some oak trees planted at the time are known to-day as Bligh's oaks. The rest of the land was disposed of when the present manse was purchased, in 1902, as it was not suitable for manse purposes. Here the grain was stored under Government supervision. Philip's, Sydney, the body being removed in 1856 to Sandhills (Devonshire Street Cemetery), and in 1901 again removed to La Perouse, Botany. Ship Porpoise, Chief Magistrate throughout the Territory, and Aid de Camp to His Excellency Governor Bligh. Aged 27 years." Governor Bligh appointed Andrew Thompson as his bailiff or agent, and left the entire management of his farm in his hands. A small Wesleyan school was also taught by Edward Eagar (an emancipist lawyer), who also conducted divine service, and the same year, 1812, efforts were started to raise funds to build a chapel. Leigh arrived in the colony in the Hebe on 15th August, 1815. Samuel Marsden, Church of England Senior Chaplain, and they travelled to and from New Zealand together. Marsden had a large farm, portion of which extended right into the town of Windsor, and, knowing the desire for the erection of a chapel in Windsor, he presented Mr. Carvosso in 1820, and a house was bought for him, at a cost of two hundred and seventy pounds, known as the Mission House. He was in Sydney and Parramatta about the years 1822-5, and went to Hobart Town in May, 1825. A son, William, who was born in the Mission House, Windsor, died in England, in 1842. The largest of these granaries stood on the present site of the School of Arts, and was used later as a military hospital. The inscription on the old tombstone reads:— "Sacred. In October, 1807, the Governor's stock consisted of forty-nine cows, and a number of sheep and pigs. During the big floods in 18, he took a very active part in rescuing people and property in danger. An appeal was made in 1816 to the Missionary Society in London for assistance to have this building erected. Leigh with the site on which the church now stands. Walter Lawry, of Parramatta, who arrived in New South Wales the same year, assisting. His father wrote a small biography of him, entitled, Attractive Piety, published in 1847. The same year efforts were made to grow rice, but with little success. During the years 1804-5 Governor King proclaimed the following Commons in the district:— Ham Common. Later Trustees for Ham Common were: Abraham Cornwell, Robert Fitzgerald, George Bowman. A school was also established at an early period, situated near South Creek, just behind the Court House. The residents took an interest in the affairs of the colony in those early days. He was presented with a large puree of sovereigns, subscribed by all denominations. This he carried on at Scotland Island, near Newport, at the mouth of the Hawkesbury. Some good cedar trees were growing in the district, and settlers were prohibited from cutting them, as the Government claimed them all. Thomas Arndell and Charles Grimes, Deputy Surveyor, were appointed resident magistrates in 1802. Grimes left the district in 1803, and was succeeded by Surveyor G. Trustees: William Cox, John Bowman, Andrew Thompson, Edward Tutterill, William Minchin. Trustees: Andrew Thompson, Thomas Biggars, Thomas Tyler. As will be seen on reference to the articles on "Schools and Churches" elsewhere, divine service was held at the Hawkesbury by Rev. A covered waggon began to ply three times a week between Windsor and Sydney, starting on 9th February, 1805. An address was presented by them to the Senior Chaplain, Rev. Marsden, on the occasion of his visiting England in 1807. A big flood in Maitland in 1875 called forth the sympathy of the Windsor residents, who subscribed one hundred and ten pounds for the relief fund. It is said that he also had an illicit distillery here. Biggars got a similar reward at the same time, spirits in those days, as was well-known, being a medium of exchange.

speed dating campbelltown nsw-85

As late as the year 1858 Windsor was considered the fourth town in the colony. William Walker in that year gave the following list of populations: Parramatta 15,758, Maitland 15,290, Bathurst 12,005, Windsor 8,431, Goulburn 7,028. In the year 1820, a party of explorers left Windsor to examine the Hunter River district. The party returned via the present site of Maitland, and several of the old Windsor residents became pioneers of that northern district. Fifteen hundred pounds was paid for it to Thompson's trustees in 1812. John Howe, Clerk of Market, pro tem." In 1831, the following were the Windsor contractors for the supply of stores, firewood, and cartage for the local Government survey parties:—Jas. The Roman Catholic Church got their grant from this in 1837. In his will he named as executors, John Howe, Simeon Lord (he was the father of the late George W. Active, intelligent, and industrious of manners, mild and conciliatory, with a heart generous and humane, Mr. By these means he raised himself to a state of respectability and affluence which enabled him to indulge the generosity of his nature In assisting his fellow Creatures in distress more particularly in the Calamitous Floods of the river Hawkesbury in the Years 18, and [when] at the immediate risque of his life and perminant injury of his health he exerted himself each time during three successive Days and Nights in saving the lives and Properties of numbers who but for him must have Perished. Thompsons good Conduct, Governor Macquarie appointed him Justice of the Peace. Amongst the leading laymen in the church in the past years, we find:—Mr. His history and numerous occupations are fully dealt with in another place. The time occupied on the journey was sixteen hours, and William Roberts was the enterprising coachman. In connection with the brewery he also kept a public-house. In the year 1826 the members of the Windsor chapel raised the large sum of three hundred and fifty-six pounds, nineteen shillings for missionary work. In the year 1802 the Gist bridge (a floating structure) was built over the South Creek. Trustees: Mathew Lock, Edward Robinson, Henry Baldwin. Ship and boat building was parried on at tins time along the banks of the Hawkesbury, to which reference is made in Chapter II. In 1880 two of these were replaced by Benjamin Richards and David Cobcroft. Dean Hallinan left Windsor, after a ministry of twenty-two years in the Roman Catholic Church. Another industry he started was the manufacture of salt. The leading Wesleyan laymen in these early days were:—Messrs. Baker afterwards kept an hotel in Baker Street, known as the Royal Oak. On account of distress caused by floods the Governor curtailed the sale of rum during the year 1798. He next appears on the scene as a brewer, receiving permission on 11th May, 1806, to sell at a shilling a gallon, and small beer sixpence. The old Government House was also built about this time as a residence for Lieutenant Edward Abbott, commander of the troops for the N. About the year 1800 there appeared on the Hawkesbury a settler named Andrew Thompson, who played a leading part in the development of the district up to the time of his death in 1810. His brewery was situated on the bank of the South Creek. Hughes (who was the schoolmaster at Richmond, and formerly at Windsor), R.

Leave a Reply