Oxygen isotope dating

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Indeed, the figure shows an automatic instrumentation which allows measurement of thermoluminescence light from samples and also the determination of the dose rate per year.This last procedure involves the use of a radioactive source, though very weak.Energy absorbed from ionizing radiation frees electrons to move through the crystal lattice, some of which are trapped at imperfections in the crystal lattice.Later, heating releases the trapped electrons, producing light.Thermoluminescence dating is generally not very accurate.

The last time a crystal was reheated and its electrons were released is known as a "clock resetting event".When the object is heated to 350 degrees Celsius the trapped electrons are released and this is called a clock resetting event.From this time on, electrons start to build up again because of the natural radioactivity.When the sample is heated in the lab, it releases thermoluminescence light.The intensity of the thermoluminescence light is proportional to the time that has passed from the last clock resetting event, which for ceramics correspond to when it was baked.

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