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Also, we don't come here to chat shite about religion or whos Glascow football team is the bigger bunch of cunts. You're seeing this message because you have Javascript disabled in your browser, or because your installed version of Flash does not meet our minimum requirements. We are the Irish dating site for people looking for serious relationships. Unlike other sites, we manually screen every profile and photo before it goes live on the site.Prostitution was both highly visible and pervasive in 18th-century Dublin, centred on Temple Bar and reflected the whole spectrum of socioeconomic class, from street prostitutes, through organised brothels to high class courtesans, who were often illegitimate daughters of the upper class. The role of the prostitute in 18th century Ireland was at least partly a product of the double standard of female sexuality.Typical of this was the way that venereal disease was constructed as being spread by prostitutes rather than their largely male clients.Yet it was estimated that there were 17,000 women working as prostitutes in Dublin alone, and a further 8 brothels in Cork.Dublin's sex trade was largely centred on the Monto district, reputedly the largest red light district in Europe.A wee place to post your pictures from across God's country.Keep er' on topic and LEGAL or yer out on your arse. This page requires Javascript, and Adobe Flash version 10.0 or greater.

Any suggestion of organised prostitution was limited to a small number of massage parlours in an environment where the workers were empowered to negotiate favourable terms and conditions for themselves.Notable was the story of June Levine who collaborated with Lyn Madden, a former Dublin sex worker for twenty years in the 70s and 80s, to write Lyn: A Story of Prostitution (1987) Madden had seen her lover and pimp John Cullen firebomb the home of former sex worker and women's rights activist Dolores Lynch.Lynch perished in the fire together with her elderly mother and aunt.Anna Haslam in Dublin and Isabella Tod in Belfast, both of the Ladies National Association, organised opposition and a recognition not only of the plight of these women but also of the root causes.Emerging nationalism tended to see prostitution and venereal disease as legacies of colonialism that could be resolved through independence.

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